Author Blogs

The Pantser and the Plotter

  Sara Foster At the beginning of my writing career I was most definitely a pantser, which is writing-speak for flying by the seat of one’s pants, rather than assiduously plotting out a novel. It took me four years to write Come Back to Me, and most of it was done in my spare time

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An accidental crime novel by an accidental New Zealander: Jennifer Lane

Eighteen months ago I’d never have believed I’d be travelling from New Zealand to Australia to take part in a Sisters in Crime event. For starters, I’m not a crime writer. At least, I didn’t know I was. My one and only novel (so far) – All Our Secrets – is set in the fictional

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Crime and romance with Jane Austen: Toni Jordan

‘You’re in love with love,’ my mother told me once. I must have been all of fourteen: flat-chested, grinning in shiny braces, complete with frightening, jutting headgear I wore at night. I went to girls’ school and I had no brothers. No men in the house at all. When my mother said that, about being

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A mug’s game? Janice Simpson on the profession of writing

A Body of Work, my second crime novel, is a police procedural with social twists, although there is scant in-depth detail about police methods. Rather, the novel focuses on the interactions of the people in the investigating team. Social themes explored include secret adoption as a way of dealing with an unwanted pregnancy; the personal

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Reading Agatha Christie on the Lonely Edge of the World: Joanna Baker

I don’t know why I write books. I just started one day and never seemed to stop. Familiar anyone? I do know why my books are all murder mysteries, though. And I know exactly when my writing really started. As a kid growing up in Hobart, I had a quiet life. Mostly, I just read.

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How crime writing is like music: Emma Viskic’s secrets for writing a lyrical, rhythmic crime novel

I kill people for a living these days, but my first career was as a classical clarinet player. Clarinet was a bit of an odd choice for a child whose school didn’t run to a music program, but I threw myself into learning it with the determination only a moody teenager can muster, and eventually

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A killer setting for a psychological thriller

Megan Goldin   It’s remarkable that few thrillers are set in an office given the endless potential for intrigue and conflict in many, perhaps most, workplaces. Back-stabbing colleagues, behind-the-scenes machinations, office politics and a Darwinian fight for survival; there are few offices that don’t have an element of at least some of these characteristics. When

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The perils of publishing overseas – Liz Porter reports 

It was early February this year and I had Readings St Kilda booked for a May launch of my third forensic science book Crime Scene Asia: when forensic evidence becomes the silent witness. Then it all went to hell. I found out that my Singapore publisher’s deal with their Australian distributor, Penguin, had died quietly

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Hazel Edwards on same-sex marriage: Fiction prediction

Hazel Edwards, author of 200 books and most famously for her classic children’s book, There’s a Hippopotamus on Our Roof Eating Cake, has returned to crime. She writes: Recently my adult murder mystery Celebrant Sleuth became unexpectedly topical. I was correcting galley proofs on the day the same-sex marriage legislation was passed. Timely? Serendipitous? Or

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Method Writing with Anne Buist

Anne Buist is the author of the series featuring forensic psychiatrist, Natalie King. Here she ponders the oft-given advice, about writing what you know We all know actors do it—research who they are to play by living their lives, wearing their clothes, walking in their shoes. They lose or gain vast amounts of weight (Adrien Brody for

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How NOT to do an awards night: Maryanne Ross reflects on the Scarlet Stiletto Awards

Firstly, decide you have to prepare for crushing disappointment, so spend the two weeks over-analysing everyone’s tone of voice and body language and conclude that it is unlikely you won anything. Then spend the next week stopping yourself from ringing or emailing the co-convenor and begging her for a clue. Make yourself thoroughly miserable in

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