Author Blogs

The Pantser and the Plotter

  Sara Foster At the beginning of my writing career I was most definitely a pantser, which is writing-speak for flying by the seat of one’s pants, rather than assiduously plotting out a novel. It took me four years to write Come Back to Me, and most of it was done in my spare time

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The virtues of “bum glue”: Carmel Reilly

I’m a children’s educational writer by trade, but recently I’ve just released a crime-ish adult book, Life Before. People ask me how the two types of writing mesh together? Has being an educational writer been a help or a hindrance to writing for adults? My answer to that is that my background is probably more

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The Research Rabbit Hole: Samantha Battams

Some would say it’s because I’m a Gemini, but I have the habit of doing two projects at once aside from my regular career. True to form, this year I will have my first two books published: a true crime tale, The Secret Art of Poisoning and The Red Devil (written with Les Parsons). Researching

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Catastrophic Medical Experiments: Crime Without Punishment? – Susan Hurley

‘We had to do it ourselves before we did it on others … If anything goes wrong and the skid row bum dies, and the experimenter has not done the experiment himself, he is liable for murder. It’s as simple as that. A man is entitled to risk his own life. He is not entitled

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An accidental crime novel by an accidental New Zealander: Jennifer Lane

Eighteen months ago I’d never have believed I’d be travelling from New Zealand to Australia to take part in a Sisters in Crime event. For starters, I’m not a crime writer. At least, I didn’t know I was. My one and only novel (so far) – All Our Secrets – is set in the fictional

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Crime and romance with Jane Austen: Toni Jordan

‘You’re in love with love,’ my mother told me once. I must have been all of fourteen: flat-chested, grinning in shiny braces, complete with frightening, jutting headgear I wore at night. I went to girls’ school and I had no brothers. No men in the house at all. When my mother said that, about being

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A mug’s game? Janice Simpson on the profession of writing

A Body of Work, my second crime novel, is a police procedural with social twists, although there is scant in-depth detail about police methods. Rather, the novel focuses on the interactions of the people in the investigating team. Social themes explored include secret adoption as a way of dealing with an unwanted pregnancy; the personal

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Reading Agatha Christie on the Lonely Edge of the World: Joanna Baker

I don’t know why I write books. I just started one day and never seemed to stop. Familiar anyone? I do know why my books are all murder mysteries, though. And I know exactly when my writing really started. As a kid growing up in Hobart, I had a quiet life. Mostly, I just read.

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How crime writing is like music: Emma Viskic’s secrets for writing a lyrical, rhythmic crime novel

I kill people for a living these days, but my first career was as a classical clarinet player. Clarinet was a bit of an odd choice for a child whose school didn’t run to a music program, but I threw myself into learning it with the determination only a moody teenager can muster, and eventually

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A killer setting for a psychological thriller

Megan Goldin   It’s remarkable that few thrillers are set in an office given the endless potential for intrigue and conflict in many, perhaps most, workplaces. Back-stabbing colleagues, behind-the-scenes machinations, office politics and a Darwinian fight for survival; there are few offices that don’t have an element of at least some of these characteristics. When

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The perils of publishing overseas – Liz Porter reports 

It was early February this year and I had Readings St Kilda booked for a May launch of my third forensic science book Crime Scene Asia: when forensic evidence becomes the silent witness. Then it all went to hell. I found out that my Singapore publisher’s deal with their Australian distributor, Penguin, had died quietly

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