Author Blogs

The Pantser and the Plotter

  Sara Foster At the beginning of my writing career I was most definitely a pantser, which is writing-speak for flying by the seat of one’s pants, rather than assiduously plotting out a novel. It took me four years to write Come Back to Me, and most of it was done in my spare time

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“I Like My Subjects Dead”: Joanne Drayton

The biographer and the detective are not as far apart as you might imagine. This analogy has been made before, and there are much less generous ones. Famously, commentator, Janet Malcolm, likened the biographer to an ‘eavesdropper’, a ‘voyeur’, a ‘snoop’. Some times what I do feels uneasily close to these transgressive manifestations. Not literally,

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The virtues of “bum glue”: Carmel Reilly

I’m a children’s educational writer by trade, but recently I’ve just released a crime-ish adult book, Life Before. People ask me how the two types of writing mesh together? Has being an educational writer been a help or a hindrance to writing for adults? My answer to that is that my background is probably more

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The Research Rabbit Hole: Samantha Battams

Some would say it’s because I’m a Gemini, but I have the habit of doing two projects at once aside from my regular career. True to form, this year I will have my first two books published: a true crime tale, The Secret Art of Poisoning and The Red Devil (written with Les Parsons). Researching

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Catastrophic Medical Experiments: Crime Without Punishment? – Susan Hurley

‘We had to do it ourselves before we did it on others … If anything goes wrong and the skid row bum dies, and the experimenter has not done the experiment himself, he is liable for murder. It’s as simple as that. A man is entitled to risk his own life. He is not entitled

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An accidental crime novel by an accidental New Zealander: Jennifer Lane

Eighteen months ago I’d never have believed I’d be travelling from New Zealand to Australia to take part in a Sisters in Crime event. For starters, I’m not a crime writer. At least, I didn’t know I was. My one and only novel (so far) – All Our Secrets – is set in the fictional

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Crime and romance with Jane Austen: Toni Jordan

‘You’re in love with love,’ my mother told me once. I must have been all of fourteen: flat-chested, grinning in shiny braces, complete with frightening, jutting headgear I wore at night. I went to girls’ school and I had no brothers. No men in the house at all. When my mother said that, about being

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A mug’s game? Janice Simpson on the profession of writing

A Body of Work, my second crime novel, is a police procedural with social twists, although there is scant in-depth detail about police methods. Rather, the novel focuses on the interactions of the people in the investigating team. Social themes explored include secret adoption as a way of dealing with an unwanted pregnancy; the personal

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Reading Agatha Christie on the Lonely Edge of the World: Joanna Baker

I don’t know why I write books. I just started one day and never seemed to stop. Familiar anyone? I do know why my books are all murder mysteries, though. And I know exactly when my writing really started. As a kid growing up in Hobart, I had a quiet life. Mostly, I just read.

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How crime writing is like music: Emma Viskic’s secrets for writing a lyrical, rhythmic crime novel

I kill people for a living these days, but my first career was as a classical clarinet player. Clarinet was a bit of an odd choice for a child whose school didn’t run to a music program, but I threw myself into learning it with the determination only a moody teenager can muster, and eventually

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A killer setting for a psychological thriller

Megan Goldin   It’s remarkable that few thrillers are set in an office given the endless potential for intrigue and conflict in many, perhaps most, workplaces. Back-stabbing colleagues, behind-the-scenes machinations, office politics and a Darwinian fight for survival; there are few offices that don’t have an element of at least some of these characteristics. When

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