Author Blogs

The Pantser and the Plotter

  Sara Foster At the beginning of my writing career I was most definitely a pantser, which is writing-speak for flying by the seat of one’s pants, rather than assiduously plotting out a novel. It took me four years to write Come Back to Me, and most of it was done in my spare time

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Hazel Edwards on same-sex marriage: Fiction prediction

Hazel Edwards, author of 200 books and most famously for her classic children’s book, There’s a Hippopotamus on Our Roof Eating Cake, has returned to crime. She writes: Recently my adult murder mystery Celebrant Sleuth became unexpectedly topical. I was correcting galley proofs on the day the same-sex marriage legislation was passed. Timely? Serendipitous? Or

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Method Writing with Anne Buist

Anne Buist is the author of the series featuring forensic psychiatrist, Natalie King. Here she ponders the oft-given advice, about writing what you know We all know actors do it—research who they are to play by living their lives, wearing their clothes, walking in their shoes. They lose or gain vast amounts of weight (Adrien Brody for

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How NOT to do an awards night: Maryanne Ross reflects on the Scarlet Stiletto Awards

Firstly, decide you have to prepare for crushing disappointment, so spend the two weeks over-analysing everyone’s tone of voice and body language and conclude that it is unlikely you won anything. Then spend the next week stopping yourself from ringing or emailing the co-convenor and begging her for a clue. Make yourself thoroughly miserable in

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Ellie goes hybrid

by Ellie Marney I self-published my first book this year. No Limits was originally conceived and written as a spin-off to my first trilogy, the Every series. I write in YA crime/romantic suspense, and No Limits is in the same genre: it’s a story about a rough diamond boy and a police sergeant’s daughter going

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Australian adventures with Holmes & Watson

Narrelle M Harris I was a late bloomer when it comes to Sherlock Holmes. The first Holmes I knew was through television and film, and while the general idea of the character and his cases were intriguing, portrayals of Holmes as patronising and Watson as incredibly stupid didn’t light a spark in me. Then came

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Crime writing as therapy

Karen M. Davis: If I had been asked ten years ago if I would ever write a book, I would have laughed and said that I didn’t have the inclination or the know-how. However, I’ve learned that real life is unpredictable and truly stranger than fiction. I started writing as therapy and unexpectedly found an

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What’s in A Name?

Emma Viskic: What’s in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet  –  Shakespeare I once named a character Jack XXX. Not because he was a porn star with the right, ahem, equipment for the job, but because I couldn’t decide what to call him. To stop

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How to Write a Crime Novel

Carolyn Morwood: Dig Two Graves (Hybrid Publishers) is my sixth published novel and in learning how to write a novel, I’ve tried various approaches, from strict planning to improvising and everywhere in-between. While both ends of the planning-improvising spectrum have their strengths, neither are foolproof. With planning, I was too boxed in. With improvising, I

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The gritty, realistic and persistent story idea

Sarah Bailey: When the premise of The Dark Lake first popped into my mind, I swiftly pushed it away. It was April 2015 and I was around 25,000 words into another manuscript, a story that I was really passionate about. 25,000 words was the closest I had gotten to a finished book and I was incredibly

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